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Aiming To Please, Super Bowl LIII Ads Will Be Less Political, More Fun

Aiming To Please, Super Bowl LIII Ads Will Be Less Political, More Fun

Now that we know who’s playing for the Lombardi Trophy, performing at halftime and singing the National Anthem, it’s time to talk about what will really be entertaining us on Super Bowl Sunday – the commericials.

Humor and female empowerment will play a significant role in the commercials running during Super Bowl LIII, according to AdAge.com.

You can get in on the action with several prop bets related to commercials at Bovada.

Last year, nearly 60 celebrities appeared in Super Bowl commercials. Obviously there is no complete count yet this year, but some celebs we usually see or might have seen have declined to appear in commercials in solidarity with former QB Colin Kaepernick. Amy Schumer, Pink and Rihanna most notably. Some advertisers, too, have turned away from celebrity endorsers because millennials don’t trust their authenticity, experts say.

Celebrities appearing in commercials on Super Bowl Sunday include:

  • Luke Wilson for Colgate Total
  • Michael Buble for “Bubly’ by Pepsi Cola
  • Jason Bateman for Hyundai
  • Ludacris for Mercedes-Benz
  • Cardi B and Steve Carell for Pepsi
  • Alex Rodriguez and Charlie Sheen for Planters
  • Sarah Jessica Parker and Jeff Bridges for Stella Artois
  • Christina Applegate for M&Ms
  • 2 Chainz and Adam Scott for Expensify
  • Zoe Kravitz for Michelob Ultra

Rapper Lil John will appear in an ad for Pepsi where he is seen in his favorite diner filling a bottomless cup with a “long pour” of his favorite beverage.

Advertisers have figured out that 50 percent of the viewership of the Super Bowl is women and over the past few years have been making decisions keeping that statistic in mind – including advertisers moving away from making commercials where women appear in stereotypical roles or as sex objects.

This year, tennis superstar Serena Williams will appear in an ad for social networking app Bumble, a first-time Super Bowl advertiser.

The commercial, produced by a predominately female production team, will show Serena’s growth in a variety of arenas beyond “tennis superstar’ including as an entrepreneur, wife, mom and role model.

“We’re living in a world and society where people are starting to see differently and starting to understand that we are just as strong and just as smart and just as savvy and just as businesslike as any other male in this world,’ Williams says in the ad.

Another ad with some serious buzz is a triple threat: Chance the Rapper, Backstreet Boys and “Flaming Hot Nacho’ Doritos with the added bonus of a BSB “I Want it That Way’ kicker.

Doubtful we’ll ever eat them, but we’re looking forward to the commercial.

Possibly the best news about the commericials this year, it seems they’ll be less political according to AdAge. Advertisers don’t want to alienate consumers. Super Bowl commercial staple, Anheuser-Busch InBev which received backlash for a commercial that centered on Bud’s immigrant legacy, is planning to run eight ads with a focus to “elevate beer,’ according to AdAge. We’re pretty sure there will be a lot of beer elevated to Super Bowl-watchers’ lips.

All the staples of Super Bowl ads will be onscreen: beer, cars, snacks, soda – and avocados.

One commercial that as of this publishing isn’t scheduled to play during the game but already is already airing and garnering a lot of attention is the #metoo movement ad from Gillette that addresses sexual harassment, bullying and misogyny. The ad is titled “We Believe’ and includes the successful branding “The best a man can get.’

The commercial suggests that men can do better and that men can be better – and then asks “Is this the best a man can get?’

It’s been both praised as a “call to action’ for men and criticized as gender shaming.

One reason it may not run during the game is its runtime – one minute 48 seconds. Considering ad time during the game is selling for $5.2 million per 30 seconds, airing this during Super Bowl would cost Gillette more than $15 million. That’s a lot of razors.

Commenting in USA Today, advertising expert Spencer Gerrol of research firm SPARK Neuro, said that by airing the now “Gillette get(s) all of the Super Bowl momentum …. They also set the bar by which all other advertisements coming out on … will be judged.’

Another ad you won’t see is for Acreage Holdings, a cannabis processing and distribution business, according to USA Today. They reportedly created a 60-second commercial that showcased three people whose illnesses were helped by medical marijuana.

They received an email from the network saying “CBS will not be accepting any ads for medical marijuana at this time.’ CBS told USA Today tnat “under CBS broadcast standards it does not currently accept cannabis-related advertising.

“It’s a public service announcement really more than it is an advertisement,’ Harris Damashek, Acreage’s chief marketing officer told the newspaper.

Bovada is offering about 10 prop bets related to Super Bowl commericials that air between kick-off and the game’s end during the CBS broadcast.

Here are the bets:

How many commercials will run during the Super Bowl?

  • Over 96 -120
  • Under 96 -120

Which commercial will appear first?

  • Turkish Airlines -500
  • WeatherTech +300

Which commercial will appear first?

  • Expensify -180
  • TurboTax (Intuit) +140

Which commercial will appear first?

  • Avocados From Mexico -120
  • Planters (Kraft Heinz) -120

Which commercial will appear first?

  • Doritos -155
  • Pringles +115

Which commercial will appear first?

  • Bubly -120
  • Pepsi -120

Which commercial will appear first?

  • Audi -200
  • Kia +150

Which commercial will appear first?

  • Hyundai -350
  • Mercedes-Benz +225

Which commercial will appear first?

  • Budweiser +175
  • Bud Light +190
  • Stella Artois +400
  • Michelob Ultra +400
  • Bon & Viv SpikedSeltzer +400

Which commercial will appear first?

  • Coke Or Variants -170
  • Pepsi Or Variants +130