With Some Races Still Undecided, Women & Democrats Celebrate Wins

Kim MacCormack

Thursday, November 8, 2018 9:31 PM UTC

Thursday, Nov. 8, 2018 9:31 PM UTC

With most Election Day races in the books and victory declared, there remains a few races still being counted -- and recounted.

Election Day has come and gone and there are still some races too close to call that are headed for recount.

The biggest take away from Tuesday is that Democrats now have the majority in the House of Representatives. And when Congress convenes in 2019, there will be 100 women in the chambers -- the most in U.S. history.

People living in U.S. surburbs let their vote be their voice, electing at least 28 new Democratic representatives, with many contests still outstanding.

On Wednesday, President Trump declared that the election was almost a complete victory, reaffirming the direction he is taking the country. Political pundits say otherwise, saying checks and balances on the administration have been restored.

Bovada and 5Dimes were among several sportsbooks with odds on U.S. midterm and gubernatorial races. Ladbrokes and Paddy Power, which carries odds on elections in the United Kingdom, also had odds on U.S. races.

On Bovada, it was favored at -300 the Democrats would take House. As of this publishing, there are still 12 unresolved House races, most in California. That is due to mail-in ballots on need have a postmark of Election Day, so they can arrive as late as Friday and still affect the final vote.

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At the end of the day, always remember that friendship is always more important than politics 💙♥️ pic.twitter.com/QSD7x96AKG

— Colton Winters (@ColtonWinters_) November 6, 2018
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Results in selected races are:

  • 2018 U.S Senate Election winner – Beto O’Rourke (D) +300 and Sen. Ted Cruz (R) -400. Cruz dodged the Beto bullet as we predicted, retaining his Senate seat with 50.9 percent of the vote to O’Rourke’s 48.3 percent. Texans are still catching their breath at the closeness of this contest as many across the country clamor for O’Rourke to run for president. He says no, but since when does a candidate not change his or her mind.
  • 2018 U.S Senate Election winner – North Dakota: Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D) +375 and Kevin Cramer (R) -550. The bleak outlook for Heitkamp held true, and the senator lost her race to Cramer 55.4 percent to 44.6 percent. She channeled Alfred Lord Tennyson in her concession saying, “It seems like such a bitter thing to lose a race, but the worse thing would be to not ever run at all.”
  • 2018 U.S Senate Election winner – Florida: Sen. Bill Nelson (D) -160 and Rick Scott (R) +130. It was a dead heat going into this race and after the initial tally it is still neck and neck. In Florida, an automatic recount is triggered when there is less than half of a percentage point difference. Scott gave a victory speech on Tuesday, but Nelson hasn’t conceded. Both candidates – and their attorneys – are watching and waiting.
  • 2018 U.S Senate Election winner – Sen. Claire McCaskill (D) -115 and Josh Hawley (R) -115. As we thought, McCaskill, was in deed vulnerable, failing in her bid for a third term in the U.S. Senate. Hawley, the state’s attorney general, won with 51.4 percent of the vote to McCaskill’s 45.4 percent. President Trump did have two rallies in the state in attempt to seal McCaskill’s fate. It worked.
  • 2018 Gubernatorial winner – Florida: Andrew Gillum (D) -220 and Ron DeSantis (R) +180. You’d think this race would be over since Gillum gave a concession speech on Tuesday night, but as provisional ballots are being counted in the Sunshine State the margin of victory for DeSantis has lessened. Like the Florida Senate race, if the magic number of less than a half of a percentage point is reached, a recount will happen and it seems that is where this is going.
  • 2018 Gubernatorial winner – Georgia: Stacey Abrams (D) +130 and Brian Kemp (R) -160. This race may drag on while. Kemp, who resigned Thursday as secretary of state, leads this race by a thin margin, and Abrams says she won’t concede until every vote is counted. Latest results show Kemp leads 50.3 percent, but as absentee and provisional votes are counted, if his tally falls under 50 percent, the race will go to an automatic run-off. The added rub in this race is that until Kemp’s resignation, his office was overseeing the vote count and it rejected thousands of absentee ballots because of mismatched signatures. A judge has since ruled the rejected ballots have to be treated as provisional ballots and if voters can confirm their identity the votes become valid -- and that too could prompt a runoff.
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