Will O.J. Simpson Earn Twitter’s Coveted ‘Verified’ Check Mark?

Thursday, June 20, 2019 3:33 PM UTC

Thursday, Jun. 20, 2019 3:33 PM UTC

With O.J. Simpson joining Twitter, many are wondering – including the bookmakers at Bovada –  if his account will receive the “verified” badge.
<p>Apparently, O.J. Simpson has stuff to say and he’s decided blurts on Twitter is his mode of choice. Uh, OK.</p><p>The former famed NFL running back, movie actor, accused murderer and convicted robber and kidnapper joined Twitter this past weekend, just one day after the 25th anniversary of the murders of Nicole Brown Simpson and Ron Goldman.</p><p>Timing is everything.</p><p>If you are unfamiliar (really?), the former star of the Buffalo Bills was charged and eventually acquitted in the “Trial of the Century” where he was accused of murdering his former wife and her friend, who were found brutally stabbed outside Nicole’s home in 1994.</p><p>The case became a spectacle from the crime scene, to the slow highway chase of Simpson’s white Bronco to the televised trial and Simpson’s “dream team” of attorneys including Johnnie Cochran, F. Lee Bailey and Rob Kardashian. His acquittal in 1995, left many unsettled and seemingly divided many in the U.S. on racial lines with some African-American celebrating his innocence, while a large number of white Americans thought then and still believe Simpson was the killer.</p><p>A civil suit brought by the Brown and Goldman family found him responsible for the deaths and he was ordered to pay more than $33 million, much still unpaid.</p><p>In 2008, Simpson was convicted of robbery and kidnapping in an attempt to get back a trove of his sports memorabilia. He served nine years in prison and when released in 2017 went to live in Las Vegas with one of his children.</p><p>And now <a href="https://twitter.com/TheRealOJ32">he’s joined Twitter</a> and has gained 765,000 followers. His first post was a video where he said he would “set the record straight” and that he had a “little gettin’ even to do.”</p><div>[/]{"component": "embedHTML", "code": "&lt;blockquote class=\"twitter-tweet\" data-lang=\"en\"&gt;&lt;p lang=\"en\" dir=\"ltr\"&gt;Coming Soon!!! &lt;a href=\"https://t.co/R1tXOuuLgO\"&gt;pic.twitter.com/R1tXOuuLgO&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/p&gt;— O.J. Simpson (@TheRealOJ32) &lt;a href=\"https://twitter.com/TheRealOJ32/status/1139743663737622529?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw\"&gt;June 15, 2019&lt;/a&gt;&lt;/blockquote&gt;\n&lt;script async src=\"https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js\" charset=\"utf-8\"&gt;&lt;/script&gt;"}[/]</div><p> </p><p>So far, he’s posted five times, including one where he said Khloe Kardashian is not his daughter.</p><p>In his profile it states “If you don’ see it here. I didn’t say it,” obviously taking note that there are several fake O.J. accounts with similar addresses also on the social media giant that could prompt confusion. Some label themselves as Simpson parody accounts, others don’t.</p><p>His Twitter account has prompted a wager <a href="http://https://www.sportsbookreview.com/Sportsbook/?v=4588&amp;book=BOVADA" target="_blank" title="Top-Rated Sportsbook">on Bovada </a>regarding whether Twitter will “officially verify” Simpson’s account. The blue check mark lets others know it is public figure’s “official” account.</p><p><strong>Will The @TheRealOJ32 Twitter Account Be Verified By Twitter In 2019?</strong></p><ul> <li> <p>Yes -250</p> </li> <li> <p>No +170</p> </li></ul><p><strong>Our Pick: </strong>Yes, just to avoid confusion and nothing more.</p><p>“The genesis of Twitter’s verification system was to identify the actual person instead of the 7,000 fake ones out there,” veteran social media strategist Ken Burbary told USA Today Sports. “I think he should be verified. He’s a notable figure in history. There are positive and negative feelings about him, but he is still a public figure.”</p><p>Twitter spokesperson Jen Santamaria told USA Today Sports that she is “unable to comment on individual user accounts,” as stated by company policy.</p><p>A few years ago, Twitter users could request the verification badge but the company suspended that practice after being criticized for verifying white supremacists. Verification is done now behind closed company doors.</p><p>“From a copycat perspective, that could be the only reason to verify (Simpson),” Karen Freberg, an associate professor of strategic communications at the University of Louisville, told USA Today. “At the same time, that could create another issue. He’s been getting acknowledgement and what message would that send to the victims’ families? There is a very fine line to walk when it comes to the issue of who should and should not be verified.”</p><div> </div><div> </div>
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