Betting on Boxing: Styles Matter, but Records Sometimes Don't

Andreas Hale

Friday, August 10, 2018 12:09 PM UTC

Friday, Aug. 10, 2018 12:09 PM UTC

It can be somewhat tricky wagering on the "Sweet Science," but SBR is here to provide important tips on how to bet on boxing. 

Boxing can be one of the trickiest sports to bet on due to inflated records, sizable underdogs and an overall lack of knowledge when it comes to the competitors. But that doesn’t make it impossible as long as you know what to look for when betting.

The first – and most obvious – thing to bet on is the winner of the fight. SBR's top-rated sportsbooks set a moneyline based on who should win the fight based on their fight history, opponents, style, age and whether or not they are fighting in their normal weight class. Like any other sport you wager on, the favorite is likely to on the minus side (-160 means you would need to wager $160 to make $100) while the favorite is on the plus side (+140 means a bet of $100 would yield $140).

If you’re a casual boxing fan, one word of advice: Don’t be misled by records. There are many cases where records are completely deceiving on the surface. A fighter who is 23-0 with 20 knockouts can be a sizable underdog against an opponent who is 34-2 with 27 knockouts due to the level of competition. As wide as your eyes may get for an unbeaten fighter who is a +1000 favorite, do your due diligence and research whom the underdog has on their resume.

You can also wager on the whether the fight will go 'over' or 'under' a certain amount of rounds, called over/under betting. When wagering, you’ll often see a line that looks something like this: O/U 10.5 Rounds (-200/+185). What it means is that these are your odds for the fight going 'over' 10½ rounds (-200) or 'under' 10½ rounds (+185).

[/]{"component":"video", "type":"youtube", "url":"https://www.youtube.com/embed/hZxwlgUrJBk", "videoSize":"Large" }[/]

Similar to what was mentioned earlier about records, be weary of massive underdog lines. A fighter like Gennady Golovkin made short work of a many opponents and the betting line for the under was always a line that would require you to put down a great deal of money in order to yield a $100 profit. Lines like -2500 aren’t uncommon for a fight that would be considered to be not competitive. And it happens in boxing a lot. Again, you’ll have to do your research to find out if the fighter has been matched up with tough opponents, has a high knockout rate and a variety of other variables before you consider betting a huge underdog.

You can also bet the method of victory. You can wager on a fighter to win by knockout, decision or there’s also the elusive draw that yields a high return, but rarely happens. The research required to yield the best results can be daunting, but you can find some angles to get more value out of your bet.

For instance, there are times where you have a boxer vs. brawler fight where the brawler’s best bet is to win the fight by knockout because he lacks the technical ability to win by decision. In that case, it’s wise to avoid the straight bet and see what you can gain by taking that fighter to win by knockout. If he’s a front-runner who often finishes fights within the first 6 rounds, pairing the knockout with the fight not going the distance can have a lot more value than a straight bet. The same can be said for a technical fighter like Floyd Mayweather Jr., who rarely went for the knockout. Betting the 'over' with Mayweather winning by decision almost always had more value than simply taking Mayweather. Of course, there are surprising finishes that can blow up in your face but pay attention to fighter trends to get an idea of how the fight may go.

Ultimately, once you learn your way around the sport, you can earn yourself some extra money. But always bet wisely, and in your sports betting research don’t be reckless with huge underdogs because they rarely ever cash out.

comment here