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    Hman
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    Mel Kiper's Big Board for 2019 NFL draft: Top 25 prospects and position rankings 🔢

    Mel Kiper's Big Board for 2019 NFL draft: Top 25 prospects and position rankings

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    It's NFL combine week -- finally. I'm excited to get measurements and athletic testing numbers (especially the three-cone drill, my personal favorite) on every prospect in the 2019 draft. But I also want to see how the prospects interact with their peers. Who is going to emerge as a leader? Who is going to show confidence in everything he does? It's a great time of the year.


    My updated Big Board rankings for the 2019 class are below, and I'm including my latest look at the top 10 prospects at every position.


    My Mock Draft 2.0 was released last week, and we'll have full coverage of the combine on ESPN and ESPN.com. Let's start with the prospect who has been on top of my board since August:


    Note: One asterisk denotes that the player is a junior, and two asterisks denote that the player was a redshirt sophomore in 2018.


    1. Nick Bosa, DE, Ohio State*

    Height: 6-foot-4 | Weight: 263 pounds | Previously: 1
    There's no change at the top, as I've had Bosa to the Cardinals with the No. 1 pick in both of my mock drafts. He's expected to work out at the combine, and teams want to see that he has made a full recovery from the core muscle injurythat ended his Ohio State career early. Bosa is an elite pass-rusher who is advanced for his age in his technique; you can probably thank his brother, Joey Bosa, and dad, John, both former first-round picks. He finished his college career with 17.5 sacks in two-plus seasons, most of which were in a loaded line rotation.


    2. Quinnen Williams, DT, Alabama**

    Height: 6-4 | Weight: 289 | Previously: 2
    Williams was one of college football's best players -- not just defenders -- last season. And it showed, as he finished eighth in the Heisman Trophy voting. He dominated LSU with 2.5 sacks and 10 total tackles, and he finished the season with 8.0 sacks and 19.5 total tackles for loss. When I wrote about Williams after the LSU game, I mentioned his ability to use his hands to disengage from blockers. He is so good at destroying double-teams. Williams played only one full season for the Tide, but he was tremendous. He's the best 3-technique penetrator in this draft.



    3. Josh Allen, OLB, Kentucky

    Height: 6-5 | Weight: 230 | Previously: 3
    I pegged Allen before the season as a potential Day 2 pick after he broke out in 2017 with seven sacks, 66 tackles and one interception. But then he went and had 17 sacks -- with five forced fumbles -- and was dominant last season. I had him all the way up to No. 2 to the 49ers in my first and second mock drafts. Allen is disruptive, and he has the length that NFL teams love in a 3-4 outside linebacker.


    4. Devin White, LB, LSU*

    Height: 6-1 | Weight: 240 | Previously: 4
    White is one of my favorite prospects in this class, and I noted in our draft primer that he's a perfect fit for today's NFL. During a spectacular breakout 2017 season, he had 133 tackles, 14 tackles for loss, 4.5 sacks and an interception. White dominated last season, too, with 123 tackles, including 12 for loss. I love his read-and-react ability. He is not a true pass-rusher, but he could play outside or inside linebacker at the next level. He has some versatility and is extremely athletic.


    5. Rashan Gary, DT, Michigan*

    Height: 6-6 | Weight: 283 | Previously: 7
    Gary needs to have a strong combine and interview circuit. He dominates when he's at his best; he just manhandles offensive linemen. The problem? Consistency. A defender this big and this talented should create more pressure and disruption. The former No. 1 overall recruit disappears too often for my liking. Gary could play end in a 3-4 defense or 3-technique in a 4-3. He has a high ceiling, and he should light up the combine.


    6. T.J. Hockenson, TE, Iowa**

    Height: 6-5 | Weight: 250 | Previously: 17
    I love this kid. Hockenson is a complete tight end. As I wrote in my Mock Draft 2.0, he can run routes out of the slot on one play, then line up next to a tackle and blow up an edge defender in the running game on the next. I had him No. 8 to the Lions. His teammate Noah Fant got all the pub before the season, but Hockenson put up better numbers, and he's a better blocker. This tight end class is really good from top to bottom.


    7. Dwayne Haskins, QB, Ohio State**

    Height: 6-3 | Weight: 220 | Previously: 5
    Haskins started only 14 college games for the Buckeyes, but there's a lot to like about him. He has a big arm, shows great anticipation on his throws, takes care of the ball and has solid athleticism (though he isn't a great runner). Haskins never gets rattled, and he excels in big moments. He's far from a finished product, but the high ceiling flashes on tape. I want to see how he tests athletically at the combine, but more importantly, I want to see how he interacts with the other quarterbacks and whether he takes charge. His actions will be closely watched.




    8. Kyler Murray, QB, Oklahoma*

    Height: 5-10 | Weight: 195 | Previously: 8
    Murray will be the most watched man in Indianapolis. And it starts Thursday, when teams will finally get a measurement on him. The weight matters just as much as his height. His agent said recently that he weighs 205, but he's listed 10 pounds lighter. Will he work out, or will he save it for his pro day on March 13? Either way, I'm excited to see him in person. You can't deny Murray's athletic ability, and he has an underrated arm. He can make every throw. I've said several times that he's one of the most dynamic dual-threat quarterbacks I've ever seen. Murray won't be for every team and every system, but if he lands in the right spot, he could be a star.

    9. Montez Sweat, DE, Mississippi State

    Height: 6-6 | Weight: 245 | Previously: 14
    Sweat was the top prospect at the Senior Bowl. I even had him in the top five of my second mock draft. It's simply because he's a devastating pass-rusher. After putting up 10.5 sacks in 2017, he had 11.5 last season, proving to be one of college football's best edge rushers. His frame has room for more weight, so he could play outside linebacker in a 3-4 or defensive end in a 4-3. He has an outstanding takeoff at the snap and has room to grow in his technique.

    10. Andraez "Greedy" Williams, CB, LSU**

    Height: 6-3 | Weight: 184 | Previously: 9
    Williams burst onto the scene in 2017, picking off six passes as a redshirt freshman and emerging as one of the best defensive backs in college football. He had two more picks last season. Williams has great ball skills and a long, lean frame, and he sticks to wide receivers. The third-year sophomore is the best lockdown corner in this class.

    11. Deandre Baker, CB, Georgia

    Height: 5-11 | Weight: 185 | Previously: 10
    Quarterbacks who go after Baker don't have much luck. He broke up nine passes and had two interceptions last season, and he had nine pass breakups and three picks in 2017. Baker isn't far behind Williams as the top corner in this class. I want to see how he tests athletically in Indy.

    12. Ed Oliver, DT, Houston*

    Height: 6-3 | Weight: 292 | Previously: 13
    Oliver didn't develop consistent pass-rush moves in his three years at Houston, and that's why I have always said the comparison to Aaron Donald is unfair. But he is a really good player and a game-wrecker -- just play the East Carolina tape, in which he had five tackles for loss. His first step is one of the fastest I've seen from a defensive tackle. Could he play end in a 3-4 defense?

    13. Marquise Brown, WR, Oklahoma*

    Height: 5-9 | Weight: 168 | Previously: NR
    I wrote last September about why I like Brown so much: He's a big-play threat on every route. He has game-changing speed and is dynamic after the catch. He can play in the slot or outside, creating easy separation with that speed. And he isn't one-dimensional; he runs every route that NFL teams want to see. The question is size -- at 5-foot-9, he doesn't look like a No. 1 wide receiver. But the NFL is changing: Speed is everything. Brown won't be working out for teamsbefore the draft because he underwent surgery for a Lisfranc injury last month. I trust the tape. He should be ready for training camp.




    14. D.K. Metcalf, WR, Ole Miss**

    Height: 6-4 | Weight: 230 | Previously: NR
    Metcalf is a freaky athlete with a huge frame -- just look at this viral photo. On tape, he shows elite traits: speed to beat cornerbacks one-on-one, the physicality to go over the middle and the athleticism to outjump any defender. The problem? Health. He had a scary neck injury that ended his 2018 season early, though he is going to work out at the combine. He also broke his foot in 2016. This ranking is about projection because he could be a scary-good No. 1 receiver. He's going to test well at the combine, but the medical check is more important.


    15. Byron Murphy, CB, Washington**

    Height: 5-11 | Weight: 182 | Previously: 25
    After redshirting in 2016, Murphy snagged two picks in his first college game last season. He's a natural playmaker with easy speed. Murphy missed seven games in 2017 because of a broken foot, but he has played well since. He had four interceptions, 13 pass breakups and four tackles for loss. The third-year sophomore isn't as big as former Huskies corner Marcus Peters, but he makes that kind of impact. He could also play some in the slot in the NFL, which is a valuable skill.


    16. Jonah Williams, OT, Alabama*

    Height: 6-5 | Weight: 301 | Previously: 6
    It's not easy to start for Nick Saban as a freshman, but that's exactly what Williams did when he lined up as the right tackle in Week 1 in 2016. Now he has started 43 games the past three seasons, playing on the left side in 2017 and 2018. Williams could move inside to guard at the next level, and I compared him to Washington's Brandon Scherff in our preview of the class. It's all about arm length here when he gets measured in Indy.


    17. Jachai Polite, OLB, Florida*

    Height: 6-2 | Weight: 242 | Previously: 16
    Polite is an edge rusher who keeps rising, like Kentucky's Josh Allen, and he was the Gators' best player in 2018. He had 11 sacks and 17.5 total tackles for loss. Polite plays with a ton of energy. He's aggressive. It was his first season as a full-time starter because he hurt his shoulder in the middle of the 2017 season. He plays with his hand in the dirt as a defensive end, but I think he's probably a 3-4 outside linebacker in the NFL.


    18. Dexter Lawrence, DT, Clemson

    Height: 6-5 | Weight: 340 | Previously: NR
    As I wrote in my way-too-early Big Board, big-bodied guys who move like Lawrence and can eat gaps don't last long in the draft. And Lawrence has shown that he is more than a plugger -- he had nine sacks in his first two seasons. Turn on the tape, and you'll see Lawrence take on blockers and throw them aside. He's also 1-for-1 on turning carries into touchdowns. I expect Lawrence to work out well for his size, but he needs to show that he is explosive and has some pass-rushing upside.


    19. Jawaan Taylor, OT, Florida*

    Height: 6-5 | Weight: 328 | Previously: 22
    Taylor is a mauler on the edge. He will likely play right tackle at the next level; he made 33 starts there in college. His technique is still raw, but he has the potential to be the first offensive lineman off the board. Some teams might like him at guard, too, and the versatility is a plus.


    20. Devin Bush, LB, Michigan*

    Height: 5-11 | Weight: 233 | Previously: 11
    Bush is a playmaker. He lines up all over the field and is always around the ball. He caught my eye early last season as a sophomore when he had 102 tackles, including 9.5 for loss, and an interception. He had 79 tackles and five sacks in 2018. I scouted his dad, Devin Bush Sr., a first-round pick out of Florida State in 1995 who had a 41-inch vertical.


    21. Josh Jacobs, RB, Alabama*

    Height: 5-10 | Weight: 216 | Previously: 18
    Jacobs has been getting a lot of buzz from people in the league as an all-purpose back who is extremely explosive. His overall numbers didn't pop as he split time in the Crimson Tide backfield, but he showed his potential in the College Football Playoff win over Oklahoma, with 158 yards from scrimmage and a touchdown. He has some receiving ability and could develop into a complete back. Jacobs is a tough, physical runner who is hard to bring down. Plus, he has limited tread on his tires, with just 300 touches over three college seasons.


    22. Christian Wilkins, DT, Clemson

    Height: 6-4 | Weight: 310 | Previously: 20
    I have compared Wilkins to former Alabama defensive lineman Jonathan Allenbecause he's scheme-versatile and could play end or tackle in the NFL. Wilkins had 15 tackles for loss last season, and he was one of the locker room leaders for the national champions. Wilkins has been underrated playing on an extremely talented Tigers defensive line, but he could be the first Clemson prospect off the board.


    23. Clelin Ferrell, DE, Clemson*

    Height: 6-5 | Weight: 265 | Previously: 15
    I thought Ferrell could have been a first-round pick in the 2018 draft as a third-year sophomore. He had 9.5 sacks in 2017 and added another 11.5 last season. He terrorized Texas A&M and Georgia Southern with two sacks apiece and multiple pressures. He is likely to be a traditional defensive end on a 4-3 defense.


    24. Johnathan Abram, S, Mississippi State

    Height: 6-0 | Weight: 215 | Previously: 23
    Abram flirted with my top 40 all last season, and I moved him up to my No. 1 safety in this class a few weeks ago. He stepped up during the second half of the season and was a tone-setter for the Bulldogs' defense, finishing with 99 tackles, two interceptions and three sacks. He is extremely physical in the run game and has good hips and feet in pass coverage. Abrams was supposed to compete in the Senior Bowl, but he was held out because of an undisclosed injury. We still need to see his true speed, so I hope he's healthy enough to run at the combine.


    25. Andre Dillard, OT, Washington State

    Height: 6-5 | Weight: 306 | Previously: 24
    Dillard is a big riser after the Senior Bowl. He was one of the best prospects there, and he held his own against every pass-rusher. His strength is in moving his feet in pass protection -- a must for Cougars coach Mike Leach -- and he showed in Mobile that he can handle power rushers, too. If Dillard, a three-year starter at Washington State, tests well at the combine, he could keep rising in the first-round discussion. As the NFL continues to get more pass-happy, teams need left tackles with good feet. That's Dillard.


    Top 10 prospects by position

    Quarterbacks

    1. **Dwayne Haskins, Ohio State
    2. *Kyler Murray, Oklahoma
    3. Drew Lock, Missouri
    4. *Daniel Jones, Duke
    5. Will Grier, West Virginia
    6. Ryan Finley, NC State
    7. *Jarrett Stidham, Auburn
    8. *Tyree Jackson, Buffalo
    9. Clayton Thorson, Northwestern
    10. Gardner Minshew, Washington State


    Running backs

    1. *Josh Jacobs, Alabama
    2. *Damien Harris, Alabama
    3. *Darrell Henderson, Memphis
    4. *Devin Singletary, Florida Atlantic
    5. *David Montgomery, Iowa State
    6. Bryce Love, Stanford
    7. *Rodney Anderson, Oklahoma
    8. *Elijah Holyfield, Georgia
    9. *Miles Sanders, Penn State
    10. *Benny Snell Jr., Kentucky


    Quarterbacks

    1. **Dwayne Haskins, Ohio State
    2. *Kyler Murray, Oklahoma
    3. Drew Lock, Missouri
    4. *Daniel Jones, Duke
    5. Will Grier, West Virginia
    6. Ryan Finley, NC State
    7. *Jarrett Stidham, Auburn
    8. *Tyree Jackson, Buffalo
    9. Clayton Thorson, Northwestern
    10. Gardner Minshew, Washington State


    Running backs

    1. *Josh Jacobs, Alabama
    2. *Damien Harris, Alabama
    3. *Darrell Henderson, Memphis
    4. *Devin Singletary, Florida Atlantic
    5. *David Montgomery, Iowa State
    6. Bryce Love, Stanford
    7. *Rodney Anderson, Oklahoma
    8. *Elijah Holyfield, Georgia
    9. *Miles Sanders, Penn State
    10. *Benny Snell Jr., Kentucky


    Defensive tackles

    1. **Quinnen Williams, Alabama
    2. *Ed Oliver, Houston
    3. *Dexter Lawrence, Clemson
    4. Christian Wilkins, Clemson
    5. *Jeffery Simmons, Mississippi State
    6. Jerry Tillery, Notre Dame
    7. *Dre'Mont Jones, Ohio State
    8. Gerald Willis III, Miami (Fla.)
    9. Khalen Saunders, Western Illinois
    10. Isaiah Buggs, Alabama


    Inside linebackers

    1. *Devin White, LSU
    2. *Devin Bush, Michigan
    3. *Mack Wilson, Alabama
    4. *Vosean Joseph, Florida
    5. Te'von Coney, Notre Dame
    6. *David Long, West Virginia
    7. *Tre Lamar, Clemson
    8. Bobby Okereke, Stanford
    9. T.J. Edwards, Wisconsin
    10. E.J. Ejiya, North Texas


    Outside linebackers

    1. Josh Allen, Kentucky
    2. *Jachai Polite, Florida
    3. *Brian Burns, Florida State
    4. Oshane Ximines, Old Dominion
    5. Chase Winovich, Michigan
    6. D'Andre Walker, Georgia
    7. Chase Hansen, Utah
    8. Terrill Hanks, New Mexico State
    9. Germaine Pratt, NC State
    10. Christian Miller, Alabama


    Cornerbacks

    1. **Greedy Williams, LSU
    2. Deandre Baker, Georgia
    3. **Byron Murphy, Washington
    4. Julian Love, Notre Dame
    5. *Trayvon Mullen, Clemson
    6. Lonnie Johnson Jr., Kentucky
    7. Rock Ya-Sin, Temple
    8. Amani Oruwariye, Penn State
    9. *Justin Layne, Michigan State
    10. *Joejuan Williams, Vanderbilt


    Safeties

    1. Johnathan Abram, Mississippi State
    2. *Deionte Thompson, Alabama
    3. Nasir Adderley, Delaware
    4. *Chauncey Gardner-Johnson, Florida
    5. Juan Thornhill, Virginia
    6. *Taylor Rapp, Washington
    7. Will Harris, Boston College
    8. *Amani Hooker, Iowa
    9. Jaquan Johnson, Miami (Fla.)
    10. Darnell Savage Jr., Maryland


    Punters and kickers

    1. Jake Bailey, Stanford (P)
    2. Tyler Newsome, Notre Dame (P)
    3. John Baron II, San Diego State (K)
    4. Matt Gay, Utah (K)
    5. Cody Grace, Arkansas State (P)
    6. Sterling Hofrichter, Syracuse (P)
    7. Cole Tracy, LSU (PK)
    8. Mitch Wishnowsky, Utah (P)
    9. Stefan Flintoft, UCLA (P)
    10. Chase McLaughlin, Illinois (K)

    8. Kyler Murray, QB, Oklahoma*

    Height: 5-10 | Weight: 195 | Previously: 8
    Murray will be the most watched man in Indianapolis. And it starts Thursday, when teams will finally get a measurement on him. The weight matters just as much as his height. His agent said recently that he weighs 205, but he's listed 10 pounds lighter. Will he work out, or will he save it for his pro day on March 13? Either way, I'm excited to see him in person. You can't deny Murray's athletic ability, and he has an underrated arm. He can make every throw. I've said several times that he's one of the most dynamic dual-threat quarterbacks I've ever seen. Murray won't be for every team and every system, but if he lands in the right spot, he could be a star.

    9. Montez Sweat, DE, Mississippi State

    Height: 6-6 | Weight: 245 | Previously: 14
    Sweat was the top prospect at the Senior Bowl. I even had him in the top five of my second mock draft. It's simply because he's a devastating pass-rusher. After putting up 10.5 sacks in 2017, he had 11.5 last season, proving to be one of college football's best edge rushers. His frame has room for more weight, so he could play outside linebacker in a 3-4 or defensive end in a 4-3. He has an outstanding takeoff at the snap and has room to grow in his technique.

    10. Andraez "Greedy" Williams, CB, LSU**

    Height: 6-3 | Weight: 184 | Previously: 9
    Williams burst onto the scene in 2017, picking off six passes as a redshirt freshman and emerging as one of the best defensive backs in college football. He had two more picks last season. Williams has great ball skills and a long, lean frame, and he sticks to wide receivers. The third-year sophomore is the best lockdown corner in this class.

    11. Deandre Baker, CB, Georgia

    Height: 5-11 | Weight: 185 | Previously: 10
    Quarterbacks who go after Baker don't have much luck. He broke up nine passes and had two interceptions last season, and he had nine pass breakups and three picks in 2017. Baker isn't far behind Williams as the top corner in this class. I want to see how he tests athletically in Indy.

    12. Ed Oliver, DT, Houston*

    Height: 6-3 | Weight: 292 | Previously: 13
    Oliver didn't develop consistent pass-rush moves in his three years at Houston, and that's why I have always said the comparison to Aaron Donald is unfair. But he is a really good player and a game-wrecker -- just play the East Carolina tape, in which he had five tackles for loss. His first step is one of the fastest I've seen from a defensive tackle. Could he play end in a 3-4 defense?

    13. Marquise Brown, WR, Oklahoma*

    Height: 5-9 | Weight: 168 | Previously: NR
    I wrote last September about why I like Brown so much: He's a big-play threat on every route. He has game-changing speed and is dynamic after the catch. He can play in the slot or outside, creating easy separation with that speed. And he isn't one-dimensional; he runs every route that NFL teams want to see. The question is size -- at 5-foot-9, he doesn't look like a No. 1 wide receiver. But the NFL is changing: Speed is everything. Brown won't be working out for teamsbefore the draft because he underwent surgery for a Lisfranc injury last month. I trust the tape. He should be ready for training camp.

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  2. #2
    gojetsgomoxies
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    OP, thx

    seems like DE and/or pass rush (could be interior) has become the most valued area by far. interesting OL doesn't seem to be nearly as selective about players. bad grammar: but far more DE's and hybrid's DE's get drafted high than OT. and not just this year but esp. this year.

    i think pass rush being key makes sense. as one dominant pass rusher cuts down the time on all 4 receivers. a dominant CB just means they pass it to someone else, maybe as a first option.

  3. #3
    gojetsgomoxies
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    btw, random Q....... but if you have elite WR playing against elite CB. will the CB always cover him? or do they do it by side of field (long vs. short side too)?.. i guess it could depend on team

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